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The Instigator
anc2006
Pro (for)
The Contender
lalala8888
Con (against)

Sweeping robot isn't a robot

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Debate Round Forfeited
lalala8888 has forfeited round #3.
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Time Remaining
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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 9/19/2019 Category: Arts
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Debating Period
Viewed: 214 times Debate No: 123012
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (0)
Votes (0)

 

anc2006

Pro

Robot: (especially in science fiction) a machine resembling a human being and able to replicate certain human movements and functions automatically.

The robot barely resembles a human at all when comes to this. If he can use a broomstick properly as a human can do I will pass it on.
lalala8888

Con

What do you mean that a sweeping robot isn't a robot? Your definition of a robot is "must look like human. " That is a very narrow view of robots that is typically used in reference to science fiction. Although that is listed as the first definition in google when you search up robot definition the second definition is this :"a machine capable of carrying out a complex series of actions automatically, Especially one programmable by a computer. " That clearly includes sweeping robots, Which are carrying out complex actions automatically. Due to you being the defender of this argument, You must prove that you are right in all definitions, So even though the first definition does benefit you it doesn't mean that you are correct. In addition, If you skip the first google result, You will find that nearly all the other definitions support my point of view.
Alright, Good luck.

P. S. In case people don't believe me in my description of the 1st definition, Here it is: (especially in science fiction) a machine resembling a human being and able to replicate certain human movements and functions automatically.
Debate Round No. 1
anc2006

Pro

So, I disagree.

First, If any machine that is designed even to do 1 task is considered a robot then you might as well make cars, Trains, Dishwashers and lamps robots.

A machine that satisfies any of the 3 rules might be a robot:
1. Nonbiotic
2. Have meaningful executions
3. Consumes electricity

You might as well say that machine doesn't have its own sense of executions, But when it is complicated enough, An illusion of the same sense will be given. Meanwhile the sweeper one doesn't even come CLOSE to it to ever that it has done is a sensor and vacuum roaming around the house and trip a few dogs along the way unintended. The sweeper's sense is so primitive that it is nearly a stick. It doesn't have its own sense or even an illusion of such because if so it can draw artistic touches if a sand dispenser is put on its back, But no it just stops on the cornering edge of the room like a screensaver.

You might as well say, But it operate itself, So it is a robot! Haha, Then evaluate a lamp, A disco ball, And a boat with electric waterproof motors, All can operate itself but yet too simple to be a robot. Let's say a speaker with a flash drive inserted and will random shuffle songs until the button is off, You call this a robot! ?

" carrying out a complex series of actions"

You stumped yourself automatically. The sweeping robot can't carry out difficult actions, Such as filter leathers from dust. Normal sweepers can only roam around and suck whatever it is in its path thin enough.
lalala8888

Con

You told me to "evaluate a lamp, A disco ball, And a boat with electric waterproof motors, All can operate itself but yet too simple to be a robot. " A disco ball is a robot though, Just a very rudimentary one. You have a very narrow view of robots: it must look like the robots we see on TV. Just like how a calculator is defined as a computer, A disco ball is a robot because it peforms an action that was programmed. A lamp and a boat with electric waterproof motors aren't robots as there is no programming involved with it, And they work simply because you caused electricity to flow through it. Ok, That last sentence wasn't very clear, What I mean is that although they run on electricity, They are controlled by analogue mechanics.
Ok, Going back to the sweeping robot. It CAN carry out complex actions, As it can avoid obstacles and remember where to go when it needs to charge and where it already vacuumed. Saying that it's not complex is simply a subjective statement.
A speaker with a flash drive that is inserted and randomly shuffles songs is a robot, As it is programmed and isn't dependent on analogue mechanics to control it.
P. S. , Tell me what this sentence means "You might as well say that machine doesn't have its own sense of executions, But when it is complicated enough, An illusion of the same sense will be given"
Debate Round No. 2
anc2006

Pro

You blame me for not being specific yet are you? What, And how to define "programming"?

Because RAM is stored in substances anyways in the form of 0's and 1's, Thus "program" doesn't needs to be specifically be in a computer. I can just displace and replace the clocks and create a program that works without a specific computer. Speaking of which, If this is what programming does, Then why not a lamp or a stupid project on the arduino's board with only circuitry.

Your argument still stump yourself because seriously, Circuitry consider as programming, Then a lamp, A speaker and a motor all are robots. But according to your logic, If I can just build a sweeper with just wires and buttons, I'd still build a functional one, That doesn't classify as a robot.
This round has not been posted yet.
Debate Round No. 3
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